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National Park Service Article

New England Woman’s Tea Party

In 1873, Lucy Stone spoke in front of a crow of 3,000 individuals at Faneuil Hall. Her words would energize the women’s rights movement not only in Boston, but throughout the United States.

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National Park Service Article

Slavery at the Vassall-Craigie-Longfellow House: Introduction

Slavery and its extension into the new western territories plunged the United States into a terrible and bloody civil war in the 1860s, but the story did not start or end with the war. Today, we can access this history through the house and people associated with Longfellow House-Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site over its long history.

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National Park Service Article

Enslavement and Enlistment

Examine how changing Massachusetts laws concerning the enlistment of men of color in the military affected their opportunities to serve during the Revolution as well as their chances of being emancipated, if enslaved.

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National Park Service Article

Independence or Freedom

What would enslaved men hope to gain by fighting on the side of the revolutionaries for a liberty that was not conceived to include them? What effects did revolutionary service on either side, revolutionary of British, have on the subsequent lives of men of color who were enslaved at the outset of the conflict, and the subsequent lives of their families?

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National Park Service Article

Remixing the Revolution

Hip hop’s beats and rhymes take up the unresolved debates and open questions of the American Revolution – How are our voices heard? What should liberty look and sound like? What does it mean to be free? – galvanizing new generations to fight for their own answers to these questions. Watch the recording of this evening of hip-hop performance and conversation with conscious hip-hop artists The Reminders & Tem Blessed, moderated by New York Times bestselling author Adam Bradley.

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National Park Service Article

Italian Americans at Faneuil Hall

As the Italian population of Boston grew in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, this immigrant group integrated itself into the established Boston community by meeting at Boston’s traditional meeting place: Faneuil Hall.